What Is the Future for Newspaper in Hotels?

We just talked about hotel fees last week. Newspaper happens to be one of those possible charges. This CBS News video reported that a man in Sacramento, California filed a class-action lawsuit for 7 million consumers against Hilton Hotels for $5 million. As quoted in the statement, the Hilton family was sued because the hotels “intentionally, recklessly, and/or negligently concealed, suppressed, and misled customers about the scheme.”

This lawsuit was triggered by the man’s stay in a Hilton Garden Inn. The man picked up the 75 cent USA Today that was lying in front of his hotel room without knowing the fact that he would be charged the 75 cents for the newspaper.

Here, I will leave the decision on this case to you and the judge. I, on the other hand, would like to share with you another relevant CBS news article: Marriott, which was the first hotel chain that delivered USA Today and other newspaper to guest rooms, had ended the “automatic delivery” of newspaper to guest rooms in April 2009. This time, Marriott became the first hotel chain that ceased such service.

Marriott made the decision because the hotel chain had observed a decrease of 25% of guest demand for newspaper. If guests would like to read newspaper, however, they may choose to “opt-in” the auto delivery options.

I believe that “opt-in” is a very smart approach to ease the anger from some guests about the newspaper fee. When more people seek information and/or read news updates on the internet or smart phones, traditional printed media, like newspaper, have become less important to today’s travelers. So, what do you think of the future for newspaper in hotels?

Relevant discussion:
What Is the Future of Hotel Minibars?
When Will Full Service Hotels Offer Free WiFi Service?

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